25  Annual Scientific Meeting of MASPHO 2021

Virtual Conference

th

Myelodysplastic Syndrome/Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukaemia/Inherited Bone Marrow Failure Syndrome/Immune Cytopenias

26   & 27   June 2021

Saturday & Sunday

th

th

Unknown.png

Organised by:

MASPHO_logo.png
UKM_logo_v2.png

Main Sponsor

Sponsors

thumbnail_image008_edited.png
thumbnail_image009_edited.png
thumbnail_image007_edited.png
Takeda Logo.png

About this year's theme...

The synopsis of childhood cancer incidence in Malaysia (2007-2011) reported leukaemia as the most common cancer to occur in children followed by lymphoma and brain tumours. Leukaemia contributed 46.4% of the 10 most common cancers in childhood in Malaysia.

Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a rare group of blood disorders that occur as a result of disordered development of blood cells within the bone marrow. The red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets are affected. As a result, individuals with MDS have abnormally low blood counts. In some affected individuals, MDS may progress to life-threatening failure of the bone marrow or develop into an acute leukaemia. The exact cause of MDS is unknown. There are no clear risk factors but genetics and the environment may play a part. Many studies are currently being conducted to develop better treatments for MDS.

Juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML) is a rare form of blood cancer. JMML predominately affects young children, most often developing in children under the age of 4. The disorder is characterised by the uncontrolled growth of an immature form of a specific type of white blood cell known as monocytes. These abnormal cells accumulate in the bone marrow crowding out other healthy cells. JMML cells can accumulate in other organs of the body including the lungs, skin, liver, and intestines. JMML is an aggressive and difficult to treat disease but is currently cured in about 50% of cases. Currently, the only effective treatment for most patients is haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The exact, underlying causes of JMML are unknown, but nearly all patients will have a mutation that changes the DNA inside their blood cells in a RAS gene or in a gene that controls the activation levels of Ras proteins. Targeted therapies are being studied for the treatment of children with JMML.

MMA Logo.png

16 CPD Points

SPEAKERS

Prof. Dr. Charlotte Niemeyer

Medical Director of the Division of Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, Center for Paediatrics and Adolescent Medicine at the University of Freiburg

Founding member of the study group, European Working Group of MDS in Childhood (EWOG-MDS), Chair of the Study Coordinating Center of EWOG-MDS

Coordinating Investigator of the Society of Paediatric Oncology and Haematology in Germany/Austria/Switzerland (GPOH) for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and  juvenile myelomonocytic leukaemia (JMML)

Dr. Pasquale Mario Barbaro

Queensland Children's Hospital,

South Brisbane, Australia